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Plug Into Your Technology Potential

By Kelly Quigley, REALTOR® Magazine

Real Estate Technology Guide: Winning With Technology By Saul D. Klein, John W. Reilly, and Mike Barnett (Dearborn Real Estate Education, 2004)

Buy this book from Amazon.com

To succeed in real estate, you must stay a step ahead of the competition. And in today’s market, that means mastering the Internet and other technologies that can boost your productivity. If you don’t consider yourself on the cutting edge, this book by three of real estate’s better-known technology educators will put you on the right track. You’ll get a primer on creating Web sites, using the Internet as a marketing tool, and getting involved in online discussion groups.

The authors stress the importance of good technology training and of following a set technology “plan of action,” which guides your technology investments. Each chapter concludes with review questions and links to online tutorials and articles. “While many real estate professionals resist adopting technology, those who do so immediately set themselves apart from their competition,” the authors write.

Tips From the Book:

  • Get a domain name. In real estate sales, your domain name—or Internet address—is as essential as a phone number. When you attempt to register a domain name, first try your last name (www.LastName.com); if that’s taken, try your first and last name; and if that’s not available, insert a dash between your first and last names. Even if you switch companies, your personal name will always identify you. It’s smart to register your domain name now, because it might not be available tomorrow.
  • Beware of free Internet services. A number of services today offer free Internet access, but be careful because you usually get what you pay for. You may have limited service or you may have to accept advertising. Every e-mail you send may have a “free service” ad attached, which isn’t very professional. There also are free e-mail services like Hotmail and YahooMail, which have their place and purpose, but not as your primary business e-mail.
  • Encourage Web site visitors to return. To drive people to your site and get them to return, you have to provide valuable content that appeals to your target audience. Consider local content that’s hard to find elsewhere, such as the Little League schedule, or information that’s valuable all-year-round, such as local movie listings, weather, or stock quotes. Remember that most people only buy a home once every five to eight years, so make sure your content will appeal to visitors even when they’re not buying or selling.

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